Exterior lighting on an aircraft is carely coordinated and planned, contrary to what some people might think when gazing up at planes flying in the night sky. Each plane has a certain amount of exterior lighting, each with its own purpose in guiding and facilitating the plane. These lights are deliberately positioned across various segments of the plane to give pilots perceivability and direction while exploring through the sky. While there are also various other interior and exterior lights on a business aircraft, this article is going to concentrate on just a few of the most imperative lights that can be found on planes.

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The term planespotting refers to the act of tracking an airplane. While there are certainly some aviation fanatics who do this as a hobby, trainspotting is an important tool to have as the act has helped significant discoveries in investigative work. Over the years, trainspotting has helped people see suspicious trips being made by Russian oligarchs to Africa and the Middle East,  jet making suspicious trips to the Middle East and Africa, helped politicians make important points on private planes being used by the Hungarian president and other world leaders, exposed rendition flights by the Turkish government, followed the travels of government officials, aided in the discovery of military operations, analyze aircraft incidents, kept track of corporate executive movements so as to keep them accountable and more. Here in this article, we will go through the basics of planespotting and how they work...

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In the realm of radio engineering, an antenna is described simply as an interface that converts transmitter voltages into radio signals to both send and receive transmissions. Antennas can range from fairly simple to very powerful, such as radio antennas and satellite antennas. Waveguide antennas in particular are a specific antenna type, allowing for RF energy to be channeled from an air medium and transformed into a waveguide, as well as the reverse process. In this blog, we will discuss more on what waveguide antennas are, as well as the various types of waveguide antennas that are presently used and their properties.

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Aviation is an industry that never rests. With 8,000 to 12,000 aircraft in flight at any moment and 4.3 billion passengers flying a year, aircraft are constantly in operation. Despite being very advanced, just like all other machines, they face eventual wear, tear, and failure. Because of this, it is vital that they are constantly maintained to verify the airworthiness and integrity of each and every component. Within the services of aircraft maintenance, there is both scheduled and unscheduled maintenance. In this blog, we will discuss what both scheduled and unscheduled maintenance is, various types of each, and what they entail....

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In any workspace, you always want to err on the side of caution, and if there’s just one environment that you want to follow this rule, then it’s in the aviation space. Whether you are working as a flight crew or simply on board as a passenger, it’s advisable to do your best to listen closely to instructions and rules on what to do in case of an emergency. Here in this article, we will stress the importance of keeping up to safety and health standards and how one can go about doing so....

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Pressurization of the aircraft cabin is an integral part of any commercial flight. Without it, the simple act of breathing would not be possible. At sea level, humans are exposed to just under 15 pounds of pressure from the air (14.7 psi). However, as your altitude increases, the amount of air pressure decreases quickly. The pressure decreases because the air molecules are spreading father apart. As a result of this, when you breathe, your lungs take in less air and oxygen....

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No matter what technological advance we make or new methodology we utilize, corrosion of metals and decomposition is impossible to stop. As aircraft and their components are often primarily metal, these parts too will face nature’s whims. While we can’t forstall corrosion forever, it is possible to slow it down, mitigate it’s damage, and generally be more aware of when it is time to repair or replace components as to maintain the integrity and airworthiness of an aircraft.

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It comes as no surprise that inclement weather such as gusting wind, harsh rain, and lightning can be a major hindrance to the performance of aircraft. However, extreme heat can be just as detrimental. If the temperature is too high, commercial airlines are required to ground flights for safety reasons. While it doesn’t happen too frequently, it is a problem that airlines and passengers alike will face from time to time....

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For smaller aircraft, a magneto ignition system can prove to be an extremely self-reliant and compact method of fuel ignition without the use of a battery. Magneto ignitions are also used for tools and equipment that use gas such as lawn mowers, chain saws, trimmers, and more. In this blog, we will discuss how magneto ignition systems create ignition for smaller aircraft......

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The primary tool for controlling an aircraft is the flight stick, also called a control yoke. The control yoke is typically situated between the pilot’s legs in front of their seat, rising up from the floor, and is mechanically linked via pulleys and cables. The alternative is a side-stick, situated to the side of the pilot, and is typically placed on or near the armrest of the pilot’s chair. Both side-sticks and control yokes have various advantages and disadvantages associated with them.....

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In the same way that a civilian will utilize a jack, or a mechanism used as a heavy lifting device, aircraft maintenance crews will use an aircraft jack to lift up an aircraft in need of inspection or repair. The aircraft jack is an important tool because it can prevent accidents or injuries as well as damages to the aircraft. But in order to use it effectively, it’s important to know things like the basic safety operations, how to properly level items, and where the proper jacking points are located...

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Global warming and carbon emissions are a hot-button issue for many industries around the world, and aviation is no different. While the aviation industry is responsible for just 2% of all greenhouse gas emissions, there is a growing environmental concern: since 1990, the industry has seen an 83% increase in emission levels, the primary factor being the increasing number of fossil fuel-powered aircraft in the skies. Gas emissions are not the only contributor however: water vapor emissions at high altitudes create contrails, residual plumes that contribute to global warming by trapping heat emanating from the Earth’s surface within the atmosphere rather than letting it radiate out into space.

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The first job of an aircraft mechanic is to service and repair aircraft and all components and systems onboard. Once any maintenance or inspection has been done, the Code of Federal Regulations 43.9 and 43.11 require that the mechanic “make an entry in the maintenance record of that equipment.” That typically means writing down what was done to the aircraft in the aircraft’s log books.

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Modern commercial aircraft  typically cruise at altitudes tens of thousands of feet above sea level. Two reasons drive this choice, the first being that aircraft can save on fuel, and therefore operating costs, because an aircraft can fly more efficiently at higher altitudes. Secondly, by climbing to higher altitudes, bad weather and turbulence can simply be flown right over. To fly at these altitudes however, an aircraft’s cabin must be pressurized to ensure the comfort and easy breathing of the occupants...

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