It comes as no surprise that inclement weather such as gusting wind, harsh rain, and lightning can be a major hindrance to the performance of aircraft. However, extreme heat can be just as detrimental. If the temperature is too high, commercial airlines are required to ground flights for safety reasons. While it doesn’t happen too frequently, it is a problem that airlines and passengers alike will face from time to time....

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For smaller aircraft, a magneto ignition system can prove to be an extremely self-reliant and compact method of fuel ignition without the use of a battery. Magneto ignitions are also used for tools and equipment that use gas such as lawn mowers, chain saws, trimmers, and more. In this blog, we will discuss how magneto ignition systems create ignition for smaller aircraft......

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The primary tool for controlling an aircraft is the flight stick, also called a control yoke. The control yoke is typically situated between the pilot’s legs in front of their seat, rising up from the floor, and is mechanically linked via pulleys and cables. The alternative is a side-stick, situated to the side of the pilot, and is typically placed on or near the armrest of the pilot’s chair. Both side-sticks and control yokes have various advantages and disadvantages associated with them.....

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In the same way that a civilian will utilize a jack, or a mechanism used as a heavy lifting device, aircraft maintenance crews will use an aircraft jack to lift up an aircraft in need of inspection or repair. The aircraft jack is an important tool because it can prevent accidents or injuries as well as damages to the aircraft. But in order to use it effectively, it’s important to know things like the basic safety operations, how to properly level items, and where the proper jacking points are located...

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Improving aircraft performance can mean several different things. It can mean getting to your destination faster but it can also mean making your flights more efficient and less cost inducing. Depending on the kind of aircraft you are dealing with, whether commercial or private, measuring improvements can be implemented through various methods. Below you can read some basic but common ways commercial and private pilots have used to enhance their flight performance.

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Global warming and carbon emissions are a hot-button issue for many industries around the world, and aviation is no different. While the aviation industry is responsible for just 2% of all greenhouse gas emissions, there is a growing environmental concern: since 1990, the industry has seen an 83% increase in emission levels, the primary factor being the increasing number of fossil fuel-powered aircraft in the skies. Gas emissions are not the only contributor however: water vapor emissions at high altitudes create contrails, residual plumes that contribute to global warming by trapping heat emanating from the Earth’s surface within the atmosphere rather than letting it radiate out into space.

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The first job of an aircraft mechanic is to service and repair aircraft and all components and systems onboard. Once any maintenance or inspection has been done, the Code of Federal Regulations 43.9 and 43.11 require that the mechanic “make an entry in the maintenance record of that equipment.” That typically means writing down what was done to the aircraft in the aircraft’s log books.

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Modern commercial aircraft  typically cruise at altitudes tens of thousands of feet above sea level. Two reasons drive this choice, the first being that aircraft can save on fuel, and therefore operating costs, because an aircraft can fly more efficiently at higher altitudes. Secondly, by climbing to higher altitudes, bad weather and turbulence can simply be flown right over. To fly at these altitudes however, an aircraft’s cabin must be pressurized to ensure the comfort and easy breathing of the occupants...

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When determining what cabling to use on an aircraft, engineers have a difficult decision to make—fiber or copper cables? In the 80’s and 90’s, copper cabling accounted for 90% of all aircraft wiring. With the 21st century global tech boom, airlines have sought higher data rates and greater bandwidth end-to-end, increasing the demand for fiber optic systems...

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Fiber optics are considered the future of aircraft cable technology. The high-speed fiber cable is more lightweight than standard steel wiring and is extremely secure since it doesn’t use electromagnetic radiation to communicate information. In addition, harsh environment fiber optics are durable enough to handle the difficult stressors presented in a flight cycle. Coupled with its affordability, fiber optic cable is starting to be incorporated into newer aircraft cable systems...

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A machine or piece of equipment can only last as long as it can be supported. Without the proper tools to service and maintain the equipment the viability and life of the machine can quickly deteriorate. This problem is especially pervasive for the military and in the defense industry. With new programs being high demand but very limited in supply, the rate at which branches of the military acquire new aircrafts has significantly decreased. They are, instead, relying on legacy systems staying in service longer than they were built to last. Older aircrafts are further reaching a point of obsolescence because of they are unable to meet the changing requirements of current avionic standards. These have culminated into creating the perfect environment for a growing market in Automatic Testing Equipment (ATE) in order to prolong the service viability of older aircrafts....

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