The primary tool for controlling an aircraft is the flight stick, also called a control yoke. The control yoke is typically situated between the pilot’s legs in front of their seat, rising up from the floor, and is mechanically linked via pulleys and cables. The alternative is a side-stick, situated to the side of the pilot, and is typically placed on or near the armrest of the pilot’s chair. Both side-sticks and control yokes have various advantages and disadvantages associated with them.

One of the greatest advantages of side-sticks is that they are incredibly efficient in terms of space used. Side-sticks are much smaller than control yokes, and take up far less space in front of the pilot. This in turn gives the flight crew a clearer view of their instruments, and gives them more room to move around in when sitting down or getting up from their seat.

Yokes, however, have a major advantage due to being mechanically linked to one another. When a pilot pulls on their control yoke, the twin yoke in front of the co-pilot mimics that movement, due to them sharing the same mechanical linkage. This ensures that both pilots always know what their colleague is doing without having to look over at their flight controls, and prevents them from trying to take control of the aircraft at the same time. Current civilian technology for side-sticks does not provide this kind of information, though there are developments in work to change this and give pilots force feedback with electronically coupled side-sticks that experience each other’s inputs.

Side sticks are also much more sensitive than control yokes, since their range of movement is much smaller. This lets them move much more rapidly, and in turn lets pilots quickly change the course of their aircraft. However, because a side-stick can only be operated by one hand, it can be very difficult for a pilot to use it if their dominant hand is on the wrong side compared to the stick. Control yokes, meanwhile, can be used by either hand because they are directly in front of the pilot.

Currently, most modern civilian jets use fly-by-wire technology, which relies on computers and electric wires to transmit control inputs to the wings and tail of the aircraft. With fly-by-wire tech, either side-sticks or control yokes can be used, whereas aircraft with conventional cables and mechanical linkage are only able to use control yokes.

At Fulfillment By ASAP, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the control systems and parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@fulfillmentbyasap.com or call us at 1-920-785-6790.


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In the same way that a civilian will utilize a jack, or a mechanism used as a heavy lifting device, aircraft maintenance crews will use an aircraft jack to lift up an aircraft in need of inspection or repair. The aircraft jack is an important tool because it can prevent accidents or injuries as well as damages to the aircraft. But in order to use it effectively, it’s important to know things like the basic safety operations, how to properly level items, and where the proper jacking points are located.

There are many different types of aircraft jacks, including

  1. Tripod Aircraft Jacks
  2. Bottle Aircraft Jacks
  3. Tronair Aircraft Jacks

Which have the capability to sound an alarm when the weight on the load exceeds 100lbs. 

Aircraft Jacking Leveling Items

The aircraft to be maintenanced needs to be in a level position and should be well protected from any wind that could move this position. This is why most maintenance is done in enclosed hangars. Sometimes, leveling an item will require the use of an aircraft jack stabilizer, an item which ensures the aircraft stays put when lifting. Stabilizers will normally be required when using Tronair jacks.

How to Use Proper Aircraft Jacking Points

Having a perfectly pointed jack will ensure that the aircraft does not sway. The proper jacking points are dependent on the type of aircraft that you're working with. In order to know where exactly to place the jack, you should consult the aircraft maintenance manual. These points will usually be related to the aircraft’s center of gravity.

Aircraft Jacking Safety Precautions

Before beginning work, it’s vital that the first step be to inspect the jack. This means checking the safety locks, the conditions of the pins, and its general serviceability. If there is an issue with the jack, then it should be replaced with another properly functioning one so as to prevent injury to maintenance workers or damage to the aircraft.

At Fulfilment by ASAP, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the unique parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@fulfillmentbyasap.com or call us at 1-920-785-6790.


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Improving aircraft performance can mean several different things. It can mean getting to your destination faster but it can also mean making your flights more efficient and less cost inducing. Depending on the kind of aircraft you are dealing with, whether commercial or private, measuring improvements can be implemented through various methods. Below you can read some basic but common ways commercial and private pilots have used to enhance their flight performance.

  1. Routine Maintenance

As with any vehicle, you can never go wrong with giving routine maintenance checkups to your aircraft. Regular inspections and updates to aircraft parts will not only prevent potential complication that may arise due to faulty or old parts, but it will also ensure that your aircraft will fly at its full speed and potential

  1. Reducing Weight

This may seem like an obvious route to take. You see it all the time in films- the villain is trying to make a getaway on a boat or plane, they realize they need to “lighten the load” and consequently do away with a disposable henchmen to allow for a faster escape. There’s definitely some truth to this. Less weight on an aircraft means you can have shorter takeoff roll, improved incline rate, lower stall speed, increased cruising speed, as well as an improved incline rate.

  1. Reduce Drag

In order to reduce drag during your flight, it would be best to implement drag-reducing devices such as wheel fairings. Wheel fairings can not only lessen the drag but they can accelerate you up as much as 10 knots. They can also prevent debris from repelling upwards against the fuselage or wings or onto the pusher aircraft propeller.

  1. Picking The Best Altitude

An aircraft’s engine are typically aspirated, that is, they tend to lose power-to-weight ratio and will experience power loss at higher elevations due to lower air pressure. The more you ascend, the more time it will take to do so, meaning you’ll end up burning more fuel. It’s a tricky process but seasoneed pilots have learned that when you find just the right spot between the time it takes to climb and the winds-aloft, you can increase aircraft speed and efficiency

  1. Adjusting Your Center of Gravity Aft

The center of gravity is the balance point of an aircraft, with the term “aft” referring to the tail end of the aircraft. To increase aircraft performance, veteran pilots will sometimes make adjustments to their center of gravity aft so as to reduce induced drag and increase cruise airspeed and range. However, this is something that must be done with care as pilots will need to stay within their center of gravity limits to fly safely

These are just a few suggestions as to how pilots have increased their aircraft’s performance. At Fulfillment By ASAP, you can trust in our experts to know everything about aircraft performance and aircraft parts. Call us now at 1-920-785-6790 to ask about NSN parts, military parts or CAGE codes. You can also email us at sales@fulfillmentbyasap.com


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Global warming and carbon emissions are a hot-button issue for many industries around the world, and aviation is no different. While the aviation industry is responsible for just 2% of all greenhouse gas emissions, there is a growing environmental concern: since 1990, the industry has seen an 83% increase in emission levels, the primary factor being the increasing number of fossil fuel-powered aircraft in the skies. Gas emissions are not the only contributor however: water vapor emissions at high altitudes create contrails, residual plumes that contribute to global warming by trapping heat emanating from the Earth’s surface within the atmosphere rather than letting it radiate out into space.

Moving towards greener propulsion systems is not just eco-friendly, however. Electric motors are lighter and cheaper than gas-powered turbines, which makes both designing and manufacturing aircraft with them easier and more affordable. British airliner EasyJet aims to bring an electric battery-powered jet to market within a decade to handle short-range flights, from New York to Boston, for instance. Batteries will be provided by Wright Electric, a team of aerospace engineers, battery chemists, and powertrain experts from groups like NASA, Boeing, and Cessna. The design could make aircraft 50 percent quieter and 10 percent cheaper to fly on, as part of EasyJet’s aim to make all short flights it charts electric within 20 years.

EasyJet is not the only company exploring this avenue. Airbus Group recently introduced a multi-passenger, autonomously piloted Vertical Take-Off and Landing aircraft powered by electric engines designed for urban mobility and is intended to replace gas-powered helicopters. The aircraft boasts eight pitch rotors powered by Siemens SP200D direct-drive 100 kW units connected to four 140 kW batteries. Eviation’s ‘Alice’ electric airplane weighs roughly three hundred times less than a traditional aircraft of the same size and boasts a 600-mile operating range on its 980 kWh Li-Ion battery.

The greatest challenge for designing an electric/hybrid aircraft is finding an efficient power source. High-density sources are needed to ensure a lighter aircraft doesn’t need to sacrifice on flight range for the sake of efficiency. Other challenges include managing high-voltage systems and energy-to-speed ratios, as well as thermal issues and tolerances. Fortunately, there are numerous groups both government and private working to overcome them.

 At Fulfillment by ASAP, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the electrical systems for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@fulfillmentbyasap.com or call us at 1-920-785-6790.


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The first job of an aircraft mechanic is to service and repair aircraft and all components and systems onboard. Once any maintenance or inspection has been done, the Code of Federal Regulations 43.9 and 43.11 require that the mechanic “make an entry in the maintenance record of that equipment.” That typically means writing down what was done to the aircraft in the aircraft’s log books.

In some cases, however, the mechanic does not have access to the logbook. Sometimes the logbooks are not with the aircraft, or the owner or operator forgot to bring them with the aircraft when they took it in for maintenance. Sometimes the owner/operator refuses to give the logbooks to the mechanic, preferring to maintain possession of them. While a mechanic can make handing over the logbooks for record entry a condition of performing repairs or inspections, there is no federal regulation that they do so. So, what is a mechanic to do?

It is worth noting that the regulations do not specifically required that the mechanic have physical custody of the aircraft’s log books or maintenance records or inspection guide, and according to the FAA’s Office of the Chief Counsel, the mechanic does not need them in order to make the required entry. Instead, a mechanic can simply write down the maintenance entry, including the approval for return to service, on a piece of paper, and provide it to the aircraft’s owner or operator for inclusion in that aircraft’s records or logbooks. After all, it is the responsibility of the owner to keep the aircraft’s maintenance record up to date and show that all required inspections and maintenance is performed.

One last thing to note however; because making an entry in an aircraft’s logbooks leaves a mechanic exposed to potential liability, a mechanic should also keep copies of all entries that he or she makes in their customer’s maintenance records.

At Fulfillment by ASAP, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the maintenance equipment for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@fulfillmentbyasap.com or call us at 1-920-785-6790.



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Modern commercial aircraft  typically cruise at altitudes tens of thousands of feet above sea level. Two reasons drive this choice, the first being that aircraft can save on fuel, and therefore operating costs, because an aircraft can fly more efficiently at higher altitudes. Secondly, by climbing to higher altitudes, bad weather and turbulence can simply be flown right over. To fly at these altitudes however, an aircraft’s cabin must be pressurized to ensure the comfort and easy breathing of the occupants.

In the typical pressurization system, the aircraft’s cabin, flight compartment, and baggage compartments are all incorporated into a sealed unit that contains air at a higher pressure than the outside atmospheric pressure. On turbine-powered aircraft, bleed air from the engine compressor section is used to pressurize the cabin, while older models may use superchargers to pump air into the sealed fuselage. Piston-powered aircraft may use air supplied from each engine turbocharger through a sonic venturi or flow limiter.  An outflow valve allows the air’s exit from the fuselage to be regulated as well, ensuring a constant and consistent flow of air through the pressurized area.

A cabin pressurization system will usually maintain pressure equivalent to 8,000 feet above sea level at an aircraft’s maximum cruising altitude. A control system in the cockpit allows the pilot to adjust the aircraft’s interior pressure to match with the exterior pressure. This difference, called differential pressure, must not grow too high, as it can cause damage to the aircraft if it does. Multiple instruments inside the cockpit let the pilot or pilots know if they are within safe ranges of pressure or are exceeding them, with controls connected to the aircraft’s pressure safety valves that allow the pilots to vent pressure if the need arises.

Other systems are installed to ensure cabin pressurization is maintained evenly in the aircraft. Apertures like windows and doors are especially vulnerable to depressurization (they are, after all, holes in the fuselage), and so have multiple layers of safety systems and reinforcements to ensure they maintain safe pressure levels. Windows, for instance, are constructed from multiple layers of glass and stretched acrylic material and sealed around their edges to prevent leakage.

At Fulfillment By ASAP, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the aircraft pressure systems and parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@fulfillmentbyasap.com or call us at 1-920-785-6790.


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When determining what cabling to use on an aircraft, engineers have a difficult decision to make—fiber or copper cables? In the 80’s and 90’s, copper cabling accounted for 90% of all aircraft wiring. With the 21st century global tech boom, airlines have sought higher data rates and greater bandwidth end-to-end, increasing the demand for fiber optic systems.

In choosing a data transmission system for an aircraft, the focus is primarily on two factors—high fuel efficiency and low operating costs. Fiber optic cabling is proving to have the capacity to offer considerable benefits that accomplish these end goals. The fiber optic approach can provide an aircraft with greater weight savings, higher data rates, and longer transmission distances—here’s how.

On average, fiber optic cables are 50% lighter than copper cables, and can achieve greater data transmission using 25% less space within an aircraft. A single-mode fiber optic cable can transmit the same data as 40 copper cables; meaning 700lbs of cable can be replaced by one 8 lb. fiber optic cable. In designing the Boeing 787, engineers were able to cut 60 miles of wiring by utilizing a fiber optic system instead of copper.

As new computerized technology is incorporated in aviation, such as infrared imaging and high definition monitors in the cockpit, the need for systems that can handle high-data demands increases concurrently. Fiber optics have about a 400:1 data transmission ratio when compared to copper wiring systems. They are also able to securely carry huge rates of data across their length, offering over 10 gb/s (gigabytes per second). As a result, fiber optic systems are able to provide a larger bandwidth and faster, more secure communications between systems.

Because fiber optics don’t receive or emit radiating energy, they are more secure against interference. These systems can be installed without the precautions that we currently need for copper wiring. Copper is more susceptible to signal leakage and distortion and requires extra redundancy to prevent the system from being compromised by outside sources. As a result, fiber optics are becoming popular in the defense industry; Lockheed Martin’s F-35 fighter jets rely on fiber optic systems for mission critical communications. 

Due to proximity distortion, copper wiring cannot carry data over the length of an aircraft without needing added preamplifiers, or other equipment, to preserve signal. On average, copper wiring can only carry 1.5 gb/s between two points. Alternatively, fiber optic cables don’t need much more than a reliable connector to ensure reliable end-to-end data transmission over long distances. This allows cabling to feed directly to its destination over a greater distance, without the need of an additional avionics bay.

With their numerous benefits, fiber optics cables in aircraft are able to keep up with growing demands for high-data transmission between electronic boxes, sensors, actuators and more. The high data rates of this system decrease overall operating costs of an aircraft because they can be integrated with new technology. Through their weight savings, security, and longer transmission lengths, it is likely fiber optics have a bright future in aviation—quite literally.

At Fulfillment By ASAP, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the multi-mode fibers you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@fulfillmentbyasap.com or call us at +1-920-785-6790.



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Fiber optics are considered the future of aircraft cable technology. The high-speed fiber cable is more lightweight than standard steel wiring and is extremely secure since it doesn’t use electromagnetic radiation to communicate information. In addition, harsh environment fiber optics are durable enough to handle the difficult stressors presented in a flight cycle. Coupled with its affordability, fiber optic cable is starting to be incorporated into newer aircraft cable systems. 

Despite its novelty in aviation, fiber optic cable technology has been utilized for data communication purposes since 1988. The Transatlantic Telecommunication Cables (TAT-8) were built in 1988 by an assortment of global investors including AT&T and French and British telecom carriers. The structure stretches from Tuckerton, New Jersey to locations in Whickerton, England and Podmoth, France, reaching a length of over 3,500 miles.

The six fiber-optic cables are bundled together in a copper casing amounting to less than one inch in total diameter. At the time of their installment, the telecommunication cables allowed for the transmission of data amounting to 40,000 phone calls at once. Since then, investments in fiber optic cable technology has grown steadily at an average growth of $2.2 billion per year, with investors including the likes of Google and Huawei Marine Networks.

So, we know it’s an up and coming technology, but what exactly is it, and how does it work? Fiber optic cables are glass fibers that can carry photons (light) across the cable through refraction. A standard cable consists of four distinct layers— the core, cladding, buffer coating, and jacket. The core is made up of pure glass, which is surrounded by the layer of cladding. Cladding is made of a glass or plastic composite that has a lower index of refraction than that of the core, which acts as a barrier to prevent light attenuation, or loss of light. The next two layers, the buffer coating and outer jacket, are added as protection from moisture and corrosive materials.

These cables utilize the concept of total internal reflection. When light travels, depending on the angle upon which it interacts with water or glass, it can be refracted or reflected. When pulses of light enter the cable core, they are emitted at a shallow angle that allows the light to be reflected off the walls of the glass fiber. In essence, the glass acts as a mirror, and reflects the light through the length of the cable. Remember that the surrounding cladding layer has a lower index of refraction; since pulses of light are emitted at a predetermined angle, the photons maintain their signal and do not escape through the cladding.

Depending on the necessary fiber optics bandwidth, most aircraft fiber optic systems will include a transmitters receivers, optical fiber, optical regenerator, and optical receiver. The optical transmitter encodes light signals and transmits them through the optical fiber. The fiber optic core carries the light signal to the optical receiver. Once the light mode reaches the optical receiver, it is decoded. This data transmitting system can be utilized on an aircraft for various purposes including data networks, in-flight entertainment, flight simulators, and radar systems.

At Fulfillment By ASAP, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find the fiber optic cable or fiber optics parts you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@fulfillmentbyasap.com or call us at +1-914-359-2001.



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A machine or piece of equipment can only last as long as it can be supported. Without the proper tools to service and maintain the equipment the viability and life of the machine can quickly deteriorate. This problem is especially pervasive for the military and in the defense industry. With new programs being high demand but very limited in supply, the rate at which branches of the military acquire new aircrafts has significantly decreased. They are, instead, relying on legacy systems staying in service longer than they were built to last. Older aircrafts are further reaching a point of obsolescence because of they are unable to meet the changing requirements of current avionic standards. These have culminated into creating the perfect environment for a growing market in Automatic Testing Equipment (ATE) in order to prolong the service viability of older aircrafts.

In order to meet the limited budget that is allocated to military service departments, ATE manufacturers need to be create products that are well worth their money. In order to meet the demands of defense needs, ATE’s need to be affordable and versatile. ATE’s need to be able to support multiple systems from different manufacturers such as Boeing Aircraft Company, Teradyne, and Lockheed Martin. Essentially, what it comes down to is that the Department of Defense (DoD) needs ATEs that are able to support as many different systems as possible, regardless of manufacturer. 

Military departments are working towards standardizing ATE’s in order to fit the specific equipment servicing needs of each branch. For example, the Navy is developing what is known as the electronic Consolidated Automated Support System (eCASS) and the Air Force has been developing the Versatile Depot Automatic Test Station (VDATS). By standardizing their ATE’s by department, they will be more equipped to deal with the needs of their current machines and can plan for projected weapons advancements.

Due to the specialization that comes with creating departmentalized testing systems, branches of the military have been able to avoid creating new ATE systems and have instead been able to work around minor system modifications. Rather than creating a completely new testing system, upgrades to the current Navy eCASS system allow it to work around advancements in the machines they test. By making augmentation specific modifications to individual testing stations they are able to prolong the life of the testing system itself and ensure that the machines they service are able to keep up with the standards of the times.

At Fulfillment by ASAP, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the avionics equipment, aircraft automated testing equipment, and common benchtop automated test sets you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, aviation, and defense industries, we’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@fulfillmentbyasap.com or call us at +1-920-785-6790.


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